Meatball Parmigiana

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I haven’t done a foodie post in a while! Not that I haven’t been cooking, it’s just that lots of the things I’ve made haven’t really had an Italian flair. But this one, definitely has that Italian taste to it! Looking at the picture, it looks like a pizza, doesn’t it? But really, it’s a plate full of medium sized meatballs covered with tomato sauce and mozzarella cheese! Delizioso!

Ingredients:

1/2 lb. ground beef

1/2 lb. ground veal

1/2 lb. ground pork

4 minced garlic cloves

1/4 c. chopped parsley

1 c. bread crumbs

1 c. grated parmesan cheese

2 eggs

2 cups marinara sauce

Mozzarella cheese

Directions:

Mix together the meats, garlic, parsley, bread crumbs, eggs, and parmesan cheese in a bowl. Season with preferred seasonings. Form the meatballs (not too large – about 1 inch in diameter) and set aside.

Heat oven to 395.

Pour some sauce in the bottom of a casserole dish. Position the meatballs all around. Cover the meatballs with the remainder of the sauce. Top with mozzarella cheese.

Cover with foil and cook in the oven until the meatballs are cooked through (about 45-50 minutes). Be careful taking the dish out of the oven as the sauce may have boiled over.

All in the Family

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This little girl’s voice is quite something – maybe it’s because she shares the same genes as her grandfather, Luciano Pavarotti! She’s only 11 years old but her poise – and also her power when she belts out the notes – is pretty impressive. She definitely needs some voice training to perfect her notes, but for only being 11, she is amazing! Plus, in this video, she’s singing one of the most beautiful and soulful songs ever – and I have to say that her interpretation of this song is very moving! She probably doesn’t really understand the meaning behind the lyrics, but she sure knows how to evoke the appropriate emotion!

More Than a Soldier: One Army Ranger’s Daring Escape from the Nazis

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More Than a Soldier

Feeling a patriotic duty to defend his country after Japan bombed Pearl Harbor,
seventeen year old, Angelo J. DiMarco, enlists in the U.S. Army. Severely short
of frontline fighters, the Army rushes Angelo through Ranger training and sends
him to Italy as part of the 1st Ranger Battalion. Their objective: stop the German invasion.

Fighting on the front lines in Italy, the German’s teach Angelo a sobering lesson on life when they capture him during the bloody battle of Cisterna. Against
insurmountable odds, Angelo miraculously escapes in a way that stretches the
imagination. He survives behind enemy lines for over five months, hiding from
the Germans and trying to outmaneuver them. He begs for food, sleeps in barns
and suffers from many ailments, including dehydration, malnutrition, malaria and
exposure to the elements.

More Than a Soldier is Angelo DiMarco’s powerful story of survival, resilience and
courage.

Where to Buy the Book:  ​Amazon ​

Annechino colorfully draws the actions scenes, and richly brings the supporting cast of characters to life. A moving tale of survival in war-torn Europe.  ~Kirkus Reviews

Nuanced and eloquently written, More Than a Soldier adds to the body of WWII literature an extraordinary story of survival and a deeply affecting portrait of a
soldier’s coming-of-age. ~The iRead Review

D.M. Annechino

Daniel M. Annechino, a former book editor, wrote his first book, How to Buy the Most Car for the Least Money, while working as a General Manager in the automobile business. But his passion had always been fiction, particularly thrillers. He spent two years researching serial killers before finally penning his gripping
and memorable debut novel They Never Die Quietly. He has written and published
five novels—all thrillers. But his latest work, More Than a Soldier, is a
Historical Biography set in Italy during WWII.

A native of New York, Annechino now lives in San Diego with his wife, Jennifer. He
loves to cook, enjoys a glass of vintage wine, and spends lots of leisure time
on the warm beaches of Southern California.

Guest Post by Daniel Annechino: The Life of an Author

An ex-workmate of mine who I haven’t seen since I quit my “traditional job” seven years ago contacted me the other day because he’s writing a novel and is looking for some direction. He asked me a bunch of questions that I did my best to answer, questions about grammar, editing, literary agents, and getting published. As I typed away, I realized that not one of his questions concerned marketing or promotion. This led me to believe that many aspiring writers—through no fault of their own—have no idea what the life of an author is like.

There was a time many years ago when an author did three things: They wrote. They read. They participated in book signings. But in this day and age, an age of e-books, the Internet, social media and self-publishing, writers spend more time marketing themselves than actually writing. Unless you’re a well-known author with an established following like Stephen King, Michael Connelly, or Patricia Cornwell, promoting yourself may actually be more important than what you’re promoting. In other words, “the sizzle is more important than the steak”. Buzz is everything and buzz sells books.

Over the last couple of years, I’ve learned a great deal about the complicated world of writing. Although I have a long, long way to go before I could even begin to think of myself as a successful author (at least based on my lofty expectations), each and every day I must manage my blog and frequently add new posts. Admittedly, I’ve not given my website the attention it deserves, but I do my best. I have to maintain a presence on many of the popular writers’ blogs. And perhaps most important, I must be visible on Facebook and Twitter and network as much as I can. I have to promote my book(s) and myself every-single-day.

To be honest, I’m not really fond of marketing and promoting. I wish all that was necessary to become a successful writer was to write. But that is not the way of the world; at least not in the year 2017. So, even though it pains me and gobbles up more of my day than it should, the new world of writing holds me hostage. Before you even think about publishing a book, do some homework and learn to understand the business of writing.

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Zucchero’s Black Cat Live Tour

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Last night I got the chance, once more, to see Zucchero live in San Francisco! This time he was performing at the iconic Palace of Fine Arts! The setting was great, with the most comfortable seats ever! We got to enjoy them when we weren’t standing up to dance and move to the great beats! We were in the 3rd row, with a great view!

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Zucchero put on a great performance – I’m always amazed at the stamina these performers have! He played straight for about 2 1/2 hours, never taking a break! His band was great, too! He had players from Italy as well as from the USA and they were incredible musicians! There was a sultry violinist that played front and center and she was definitely a show stopper!

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He began the concert with some of the songs from his new album, Black Cat. The songs were good but I have to say that, sadly, they weren’t my favorites. After introducing these new songs, the rest of the night was spent playing lots of his other songs, which were amazing. He played the guitar on many of them, with his mesmerizing voice booming all the while! One of my favorite pieces was Miserere – they piped in Luciano Pavarotti’s voice from the original duet they had performed many years ago, along with the music video from that performance. This was simply stunning! Zucchero singing live while Pavarotti’s voice boomed from the recording! You can only imagine the emotion!

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Zucchero spoke to us in his excellent English, even though he claims it’s not very good! He loves San Francisco and it shows! And it seems that San Francisco loves him right back! I saw so many of my Italian friends there – friends from my childhood that I haven’t seen in ages! The Italian community in San Francisco is timeless and seeing these special people is always a priceless treasure!

 

La Befana Vien’di Notte….Trullalla!

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I posted this a few years ago….and wanted to share it again for a nice Holiday tradition!

Tonight’s the night….are your stockings hung?  All over Italy, children are awaiting the loot they will find when The Befana comes to visit.  And all women are getting ready for their day….or are they?  There’s always the question if being wished “Auguri” tomorrow is a good thing or not, since La Befana is an ugly old witch….and does it mean that whoever is wishing us cheer is thinking we are like La Befana?  Quite a dilemma, huh?  The story of La Befana is a cute one, and you can read about it on my post here:  La Befana by Tesoro Treasures.

But today, I wanted to share a fun little song from 1978, sung by the great Gianni Morandi, about La Befana.

Enjoy!

Trullalla, Trullalla!

The Befana comes at night

With shoes all broken

With a sock

Around her neck

With carbon, with iron, with brass.

On her broom

To fly

She comes from the sea, She comes from the sea.

And the snow shall fall

On the deserts of Maharaja

From Alaska to Canada.

She’ll need to leave

And she’ll sing while she leaves.

She’ll dress like a woman from the South

And with the sock she’ll arrive.

The storm will win,

And she’ll sing “Trullalla”

The Befana will arrive…

Trullalla…Trullalla!

A child,

The size of a little mouse,

Inserted himself in the chimney

To see her closeup.

When she arrives,

The Befana,

Without teeth,

Jumps and dances for some wime.

Then, hiding, she backs away

With the night stuck to her skirt.

And a warm wind will blow

on the deserts of the Maharaja

From Alaska to Canada.

Only one star will shine,

and she’ll have to follow it

to fly towards the North..

and the road is long, but

the storm will win.

And singing Trullalla

The Befana will go.

Disruption – A Book Review

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Chuck Barrett has written a page turning suspenseful novel that kept me wanting to read until the end! Of course the location helped! Much of it takes place in Italy, and especially the scenes in Volterra had me vividly seeing this ancient city through his words.

Jake and Francesca are “secret agents” that are on the hunt for an Iranian madman who is planning on causing a “disruption” of the world’s technological systems. They need to find him and his accomplices before the deadline to ensure that governments don’t topple and anarchy doesn’t reign. They are whisked from Washington to Italy, Belgium, Germany and Austria by a private jet supplied by their employer following all the clues. Along the way, they encounter many roadblocks as well as heartaches. They are smart and working along with other smart individuals, they try to solve many cases in hopes that they can connect all the pieces together to stop”disruption” before it’s too late. One such case was the search for a missing aircraft. This, along with several other interesting similarities to today’s current events, was intriguing to follow. As I was reading about the search for Air Malacca’s flight 910 that disappeared over the Indian Ocean (a story fabricated by the author), I kept thinking about the missing Air Malaysia 370 flight that disappeared a couple of years ago in the same location – never to be found. At that time, I was intrigued by the story and kept following the news – and felt that maybe it had been hijacked and forced to land somewhere. It was funny that this author came to the same conclusion. Only he expanded on that theory, as can be done when you are writing your own story, but I couldn’t help but feel that maybe the same thing could have happened to that real tragic flight.

I can highly recommend this book – I really enjoyed it. The characters were well developed and the story line was easy to follow. There was a lot going on, but the parts were all connected in a logical way that didn’t have me getting confused.

Meet the author

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Chuck Barrett is the bestselling author of the Award-Winning Jake Pendleton series—Breach of Power, The Toymaker, and The Savannah Project, as well as his latest award-winning blockbuster, BLOWN, the first book in his new Gregg Kaplan series. In addition to writing thrillers, Barrett speaks and conducts workshops at book festivals, book clubs, reading groups, writers conferences, and writers groups. Some of his topics include Nuts & Bolts of Self-Publishing based on his book—Publishing Unchained: An Off-Beat Guide To Independent Publishing—as well as, Blueprint for a Successful Book Launch, Getting from ‘Idea’ to ‘Finished Manuscript,’ Mysteries & Thrillers: Fact or Fiction, and Adding the “What if” in Storytelling. Barrett is a graduate of Auburn University and a retired air traffic controller. He also holds a Commercial Pilot Certificate, Flight Instructor Certificate, and a Dive Master rating. He enjoys fly fishing, hiking, and most things outdoors. He and his wife, Debi currently reside in Colorado.

Here is a guest post by the author:

Who is Francesca Catanzaro anyway?

My latest thriller, DISRUPTION, which hit the shelves on October 25, 2016 is the fourth in the Jake Pendleton series. Naturally, Jake is the key character in every book, but there is another character that appeared in the second book, The Toymaker, and has had an increasing presence in each story since.

Sure, I’d given a little backstory in the second and third books, but, in DISRUPTION, I want to explore deeper into her past and I wanted to share that with the readers. I guess I could have just told the readers about her past, but what’s the fun in that…for any of us. So how did I do it?

Francesca is Italian, born and raised. DISRUPTION is set mostly in Italy. What better way to truly acquaint the reader with Francesca and her past than to have her past come back to haunt her while she is in Italy? Which meant, I had to first learn who Francesca really was and what made her the precision operative she had been portrayed in the prior two books. What made Francesca tick? Why is it that she can be a cold killer? Why does she seem hardened? Is it because of the job? Or something else?

DISRUPTION will explore her past, her family, her former job with AISE (Italy’s version of the CIA), her old boss, former co-corkers, ex-lovers, and more. It made me appreciate her character more than I had before this book. Much of this will give the reader an insight into Francesca that Jake doesn’t even have. And what better way to do that than to let it play out in the storyline.

Francesca is forced with moral dilemmas that torment her for most of the story. How she handles them tells a lot about her character and how it grows throughout this book. But, alas, I have probably said too much about Francesca already.

Writers tend to grow their main characters more than their secondary characters. Mostly, I think, because that’s where we want the reader to focus…on our kick-ass protagonist or our evil, sinister antagonist. But, as writers, you should know that those secondary characters, if written correctly, can make or break a story without stealing the thunder from the protagonist or antagonist.

Making Francesca’s backstory part of the main story, without it seeming to be part of the main story wasn’t the challenge I thought it was going to be. Because, deep down inside, I needed to know who Francesca really was. And I found out.

Connect with the author:  Website  ~ Twitter  ~  Facebook

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